© JANSSENBIOTECH, INC. 2018

Stay Active to Stay on Track

Being physically active can improve your physical and emotional health; here’s how you can develop a plan that’s right for you.


You’re tired – too worn out to go for a walk with your wife, too bushed to go biking with your son, and don’t have the energy to golf with your buddies. We get it.

For those living with advanced prostate cancer, taking part in physical activities can seem daunting. However, regular physical activity can be a key part of helping to keeping energy levels up for patients with cancer. In fact, recent studies show that remaining active can help improve physical function and overall quality of life, while too much rest can lead to negative side effects, such as muscle weakness and reduced range of motion.1

You have the power to take greater control of your health by mapping out a physical activity plan that works best for you. Here are some suggestions on how to get your plan started!

Kick Things Off with Your Doctor

The first step in developing a plan is to talk to your doctor about the types of physical activities that are most beneficial and would be appropriate for you. Several factors could impact your choice of activities such as the stage of your prostate cancer and your treatment, as well as stamina, fitness level, and current state of health. It’s important to have these conversations with your doctor to set course along the right path.1

REMEMBER: FIRST STEPS DON'T NECESSARILY HAVE TO BE BIG ONES

 

You can start with low-intensity activities, such as taking short, slow walks. “Whenever I talk to patients, I try to remind them to start off small,” says Alex Scholz, Executive Director of Prostate Cancer Research Institute. “It’s important to remember that a step forward is a step toward progress no matter how small the stride.”

HERE ARE SOME ACTIVITIES TO CONSIDER. IT'S IMPORTANT TO TALK TO YOUR DOCTOR ABOUT WHICH ACTIVITIES ARE RIGHT FOR YOU:

  • Cycling
  • Golfing
  • Tennis
  • Sailing, boating, or fishing
  • Walking or running
  • Resistance training
  • Stretching
  • Yoga/Pilates
  • Traveling

Although travel is not thought of as physical activity in the traditional sense, Alex recommends it as an alternative form of activity. “It encourages patients and their caregivers to get out there and explore being active in a different way,” she says.

Put your plan into action

Now that you and your doctor have created an activity plan that works for you, it’s time to put the plan into action. It’s important to stay positive and motivated as you engage in these activities.

“I’ve talked to men who feel discouraged because they can’t seem to do the same activities or keep up the same level of stamina as they could before,” says Alex. “I remind them that while you might not be able to do them the way you used to, that doesn’t mean you can’t still enjoy them or that they’re not good for you.”

-Alex

Involve Your Loved Ones

You are not alone in your prostate cancer journey, and it’s important to involve your loved ones, whether it’s family members or friends, to join you along the way.

The role of caregivers in prostate cancer management is varied and includes their willingness to be part of the patient’s plan of action. Family members and friends (even pets!) are significant motivators and partners in helping patients get and remain active.

“The concept of spending time together is very important. We always encourage caregivers to enjoy the activities too alongside their loved one,” says Alex. “Making the use of their time with their loved ones often is the biggest motivator for patients to get out there and continue living life.”

-Alex

This article was developed in collaboration with PCRI. For more information to help you along the prostate cancer journey, talk to your doctor and visit Prostate Cancer Research Institute (PCRI).

REFERENCES

[1] American Cancer Society. Physical activity and the cancer patient.https://www.cancer.org/treatment/survivorship-during-and-after-treatment/staying-active/physical-activity-and-the-cancer-patient.html. Accessed June 2018.